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My answer (above) works as follows:
For every length you want to consider For each packet for each substring of length N increment count of N's occurrence by 1 Look at all the data you've amassed about which substrings occur with what frequency and spit out some data.
Unless you specify what your "length vs frequency" preference is you can not get a generic answer. If what you are looking for is "what are the largest, most common substrings that occur in more than %90 of the packets" then you can do it.

In reply to RE: Re: Finding patterns in packet data? by lhoward
in thread Finding patterns in packet data? by Guildenstern

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