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Re^3: Bash Shell & Perl Library Path

by tomfahle (Priest)
on Jun 28, 2009 at 07:48 UTC ( #775423=note: print w/replies, xml ) Need Help??


in reply to Re^2: Bash Shell & Perl Library Path
in thread Bash Shell & Perl Library Path

For Login-Shells its /etc/bash.bashrc - This is is the system-wide version of the ~/.bashrc file. Ubuntu is configured by default to execute this file whenever a user enters a shell or the desktop environment.

See https://help.ubuntu.com/community/EnvironmentVariables for the glory details.

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Re^4: Bash Shell & Perl Library Path
by afoken (Canon) on Jun 28, 2009 at 11:55 UTC

    But that won't help if the /home/myname directory is not crossable for other users. It depends on the Linux distribution. Some set mode 0755 (rwxr-xr-x) for user directories, others 0751 (rwxr-x--x), 0750 (rwxr-x---), or even 0700 (rwx------). Some distributions stuff all users into a group named users, others create a new group for each new user. I don't know what Ubuntu does. If all users are in the same group, the directory must be group crossable (chmod g+x), if users are in different groups, it must be world crossable (chmod o+x). The perl_modules subdirectory needs at least these permmissions, and perhaps also read permissions are required. (chmod g+r or chmod o+r).

    Anyway, this looks like a stupid idea to me. Global resources don't belong into user directories. Do we have an XY Problem here?

    Alexander

    --
    Today I will gladly share my knowledge and experience, for there are no sweeter words than "I told you so". ;-)
      > But that won't help if the /home/myname directory is not crossable for other users. 
      

      But it will. Permissions on user directories make no difference in this case - /etc/bash.bashrc is the system-wide initialization file for Bash; the only times it isn't read is if the shell is a login shell or the '--norc' or '--rcfile other_init_file' options are specified.

      I do agree that this may be a case of the XY problem, though. It sounds like using a 10-ton hydraulic press to smash a fly - since modifying system-wide init files should be reserved for absolute emergencies and treated with utmost care.


      --
      "Language shapes the way we think, and determines what we can think about."
      -- B. L. Whorf

        > But that won't help if the /home/myname directory is not crossable for other users.

        But it will. Permissions on user directories make no difference in this case - /etc/bash.bashrc is the system-wide initialization file for Bash; the only times it isn't read is if the shell is a login shell or the '--norc' or '--rcfile other_init_file' options are specified.

        No, it won't. Sure, you can specify a directory with mode 0700 in a system-wide configuration file, no problem.

        But as soon as the application affected by that configuration file (perl, in this case) attempts to read that directory or files inside or below that directory, it will FAIL -- unless, of course, the current user is either the owner of the directory or root. Specifying a directory in some system-wide configuration file does not disable access checks for that directory.

        Alexander

        --
        Today I will gladly share my knowledge and experience, for there are no sweeter words than "I told you so". ;-)

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