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Is this a valid approach to finding if a path through a set of points has completed?

by atcroft (Abbot)
on Jul 16, 2018 at 07:26 UTC ( #1218535=perlquestion: print w/replies, xml ) Need Help??

atcroft has asked for the wisdom of the Perl Monks concerning the following question:

(I considered submitting this as a meditation, but due to my lack of knowledge on the topic, I thought better of posting there.)

Recently I was thinking about a problem. Specifically, I was considering the idea from the point of view of "ants" (for lack of a better term) following all of the possible paths, and trying to think through how to determine if a path has been completed. As a starting thought experiment, I considered 6 points, with ants moving from each point to each remaining point. I thought of 5 different cases that could occur (points labeled '1'..'6', paths written ordered least to greatest):

  1. Incomplete connection - existing connections are 1-2 and 2-3.
  2. Incomplete connection - existing connections are 1-2, 2-3, 4-5, 5-6, and 1-6
  3. Incomplete connection - existing connections are 1-2, 2-3, 4-5, 5-6, and 1-6, extra connection 4-6
  4. Complete connection - existing connections are 1-2, 2-3, 3-4, 4-5, 5-6, and 1-6
  5. Complete connection - existing connections are 1-2, 2-3, 3-4, 4-5, 5-6, and 1-6, extra connections 3-5, 3-6, and 4-6

The cases map out (roughly) as follows:

Case 1:

    1 - 2 - 3

        6   5   4

Case 2:

    1 - 2 - 3
      \
        6 - 5 - 4

Case 3:

    1 - 2 - 3
      \
        6 - 5 - 4
          \   /
            +

Case 4:

    1 - 2 - 3
      \       \
        6 - 5 - 4

Case 5:

    1 - 2 - 3
      \   / | \
        6 - 5 - 4
          \   /
            +

(I realized as I was writing this that being able to find that a path might not be as useful as I thought, but that does not take *that much* away from this question.)

I'm not aware of (or at least remember) dealing with graphs in the CS classes I took (years ago), so there may be a nice theory or approach I am not aware of. What I came up with was to create a matrix containing the number of connections between between points. (By writing all of the connections in least-greatest ordering, only half the matrix had to be used, as illustrated by the following. Unfilled entries are noted as '-', otherwise the count of connections is filled in in row-column order.)

Case 1           Case 2           Case 3           Case 4           Case 5       
X 1 2 3 4 5 6    X 1 2 3 4 5 6    X 1 2 3 4 5 6    X 1 2 3 4 5 6    X 1 2 3 4 5 6
1 - 1 0 0 0 0    1 - 1 0 0 0 1    1 - 1 0 0 0 1    1 - 1 0 0 0 1    1 - 1 0 0 0 1
2 - - 1 0 0 0    2 - - 1 0 0 0    2 - - 1 0 0 0    2 - - 1 0 0 0    2 - - 1 0 0 0
3 - - - 0 0 0    3 - - - 0 0 0    3 - - - 0 0 0    3 - - - 1 0 0    3 - - - 1 1 1
4 - - - - 0 0    4 - - - - 1 0    4 - - - - 1 1    4 - - - - 1 0    4 - - - - 1 1
5 - - - - - 0    5 - - - - - 1    5 - - - - - 1    5 - - - - - 1    5 - - - - - 1
6 - - - - - -    6 - - - - - -    6 - - - - - -    6 - - - - - -    6 - - - - - -

What I noticed was that in the cases (1-3) where a connection did not exist, there was at least one row in which the sum of entries on the row was zero, but in cases where a full path existed all rows had a non-zero sum. Is this approach too simplistic-minded (or did I just stumble upon something I should have known)?

Sample code:

#!/usr/bin/env perl use 5.010; use strict; use warnings; use Carp; use Data::Dumper; use List::Util; $Data::Dumper::Deepcopy = 1; $Data::Dumper::Sortkeys = 1; $SIG{__DIE__} = sub { Carp::confess @_; }; $SIG{__WARN__} = sub { Carp::cluck @_; }; $| = 1; srand(); my %test_data = ( test_1 => { # Incomplete connection - 1-2-3 # # 1 - 2 - 3 # # 6 5 4 # symbol => [ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, ], segment => [ [ 1, 2, ], [ 2, 3, ], ], }, test_2 => { # Missing 1 connection - 4-5-6-1-2-3 # # 1 - 2 - 3 # \ # 6 - 5 - 4 # symbol => [ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, ], segment => [ [ 1, 2, ], [ 3, 2, ], [ 4, 5, ], [ 6, 5, ], [ 6, 1, ], ], # path_matrix => [ 1 2 3 4 5 6 # 1 - 1 0 0 0 1 # 2 - - 1 0 0 0 # 3 - - - 0 0 0 # 4 - - - - 1 0 # 5 - - - - - 1 # 6 - - - - - - }, test_3 => { # Missing 1 connection, extra connections - 1-2-3-4-5-6, 4-6 # # 1 - 2 - 3 # \ # 6 - 5 - 4 # \ / # + # symbol => [ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, ], segment => [ [ 1, 2, ], [ 2, 3, ], [ 4, 5, ], [ 5, 6, ], [ 1, 6, ], [ 4, 6, ], ], # path_matrix => [ 1 2 3 4 5 6 # 1 - 1 0 0 0 1 # 2 - - 1 0 0 0 # 3 - - - 0 0 0 # 4 - - - - 1 1 # 5 - - - - - 1 # 6 - - - - - - }, test_4 => { # Complete connection - 1-2-3-4-5-6-1 # # 1 - 2 - 3 # \ \ # 6 - 5 - 4 # symbol => [ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, ], segment => [ [ 1, 2, ], [ 2, 3, ], [ 3, 4, ], [ 4, 5, ], [ 5, 6, ], [ 6, 1, ], ], # path_matrix => [ 1 2 3 4 5 6 # 1 - 1 0 0 0 1 # 2 - - 1 0 0 0 # 3 - - - 1 0 0 # 4 - - - - 1 0 # 5 - - - - - 1 # 6 - - - - - - }, test_5 => { # Complete connection, extra connections - 1-2-3-4-5-6-1, 3-5, 3-6, 4- +6 # # 1 - 2 - 3 # \ / | \ # 6 - 5 - 4 # \ / # + # symbol => [ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, ], segment => [ [ 1, 2, ], [ 2, 3, ], [ 3, 4, ], [ 4, 5, ], [ 5, 6, ], [ 6, 1, ], [ 5, 3, ], [ 6, 3, ], [ 6, 4, ], ], # path_matrix => [ 1 2 3 4 5 6 # 1 - 1 0 0 0 1 # 2 - - 1 0 0 0 # 3 - - - 1 1 1 # 4 - - - - 1 1 # 5 - - - - - 1 # 6 - - - - - - }, ); foreach my $test ( sort { $a cmp $b } keys %test_data ) { say $test; my $symbol_string = join( q{|}, @{ $test_data{$test}{symbol} }, ); my @test_run = (); foreach my $i ( 0 .. $#{ $test_data{$test}{symbol} } ) { foreach my $j ( 0 .. $#{ $test_data{$test}{symbol} } ) { $test_run[$i][$j] = 0; } } foreach my $i ( 0 .. $#{ $test_data{$test}{segment} } ) { my $x = index( $symbol_string, $test_data{$test}{segment}[$i][0], ) / 2; my $y = index( $symbol_string, $test_data{$test}{segment}[$i][1], ) / 2; ( $x, $y, ) = sort { $a <=> $b } map { $_ + 0; } ( $x, $y, ); $test_run[$x][$y]++; } foreach my $i ( 0 .. $#test_run - 1 ) { if ( List::Util::sum0( @{ $test_run[$i] } ) == 0 ) { say "Missing row $test_data{$test}{symbol}[$i]"; } } # print_compact_segment( \@{$test_data{$test}{segment}}, ); # print_compact_array_header( $test_data{$test}{symbol}, ); # print_compact_array( \@{$test_data{$test}{symbol}}, \@test_run, ); } sub print_compact_segment { my ($arr) = @_; foreach my $i ( 0 .. $#{$arr} ) { print q{[}, join( q{,}, map { sprintf( qq{%3d}, $_, ) } sort { $a <=> $b } @{ $arr->[$i] } ), q{]}, q{ }; } say q{}; } sub print_compact_array_header { my ($arr) = @_; my $str = join( q{|}, map { sprintf( qq{%3s}, $_, ) } @{$arr} ); say q{ |}, $str; say q{---+}, q{-} x length $str; } sub print_compact_array { my ( $symbol, $arr ) = @_; foreach my $i ( 0 .. $#{$arr} - 1 ) { say join( q{|}, sprintf( qq{%3s}, $symbol->[$i], ), map { sprintf( qq{%3d}, $_, ) } @{ $arr->[$i] }[ 0 .. $#{$arr} ], ); } }

Output:

$ ./test.pl
test_1
Missing row 3
Missing row 4
Missing row 5
test_2
Missing row 3
test_3
Missing row 3
test_4
test_5

Thank you for your attention and insights. (And my apologies if I have wasted your time.)

Update: 2018-07-16

Thank you for your feedback. To answer OM and tobyink, yes, apparently what I am looking for is a Hamiltonian path through the set. (I didn't know the proper term(s) to use to search, among other things.) To answer bliako, yes, I know ants would have started from each point, but for simplicity I showed only completed paths of equal length. To apply this to the original problem, I can see two ways: a) follow the idea of an actual ant, and track each ant's actual position, or b) knowing the edges and their lengths, I would probably look to move down the list of all edges (tracking the sum total) and update the matrix form (above, or other method) to check if a complete path exists.

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Re: Is this a valid approach to finding if a path through a set of points has completed?
by tobyink (Canon) on Jul 16, 2018 at 08:39 UTC

    So putting it in graph theory terms, you're looking for graphs where there exists a path that allows you to visit all the nodes and return to your starting point while only traversing each edge at most once?

    I'm not sure from your examples whether the edges are directed (i.e. only allowed to be followed in one particular direction).

    If I were trying to solve this problem, I'd start with Graph or Graph::Easy.

Re: Is this a valid approach to finding if a path through a set of points has completed?
by QM (Parson) on Jul 16, 2018 at 10:46 UTC
    Are you looking for the Hamiltonian path?

    There are a number of search results here on Perl Monks, and also on the web. Google book search has one for Mastering Algorithms with Perl, which should also be helpful.

    -QM
    --
    Quantum Mechanics: The dreams stuff is made of

Re: Is this a valid approach to finding if a path through a set of points has completed?
by bliako (Prior) on Jul 16, 2018 at 19:22 UTC

    Can ants move from any point to any other point with the same cost?

    Why in Case 1 there are non-visited points? Why did the ants stopped? Is this a random walk on a line?

    In a travelling salesman problem there are costs to the connection of towns (points) - some connections are more difficult and costly than others. If you allow all points to be connected with each other and with same cost, then just list your points and move from the first to the last, one after the other.

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