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Re^2: Rogue character(s) at start of JSON file

by Aldebaran (Curate)
on Jan 17, 2023 at 05:25 UTC ( [id://11149623] : note . print w/replies, xml ) Need Help??


in reply to Re: Rogue character(s) at start of JSON file
in thread Rogue character(s) at start of JSON file

UTF-8 text files with Byte Order Mark may be of interest.

The OP in that thread just doesn't want to believe ikegami, who posts his solution essentially 3 times Re^3: UTF-8 text files with Byte Order Mark. I've seen it more than once that people just don't want to believe him. Usually something involving representations.

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Re^3: Rogue character(s) at start of JSON file
by Bod (Parson) on Jan 17, 2023 at 22:24 UTC
    I've seen it more than once that people just don't want to believe him

    Sometimes, we hear or read things that just don't make sense. Our natural instinct is to reject them, especially if they go against what we hold to be true.

    However, there are a few monks that when they say something that seems wrong, cause me to carefully check that I understand what they are saying and then question my own background knowledge. ikegami is one of those monks! That's not to say that anyone is infallible...just that the words of some monks cause more self questioning than others because they are properly saying something wise or, at the very least, something I can learn from.

      Sometimes, we hear or read things that just don't make sense. Our natural instinct is to reject them, especially if they go against what we hold to be true.

      The technical term is Confirmation bias. It can have deadly consequences in some situations. This is especially true when working with heavy machinery, like in aviation. There have been cases when a crew read a map wrong and then ignored all the warnings of their flight instruments that they were headed right into a mountain, stuff like that. Or running out of fuel, because they convinced themselves that all the warnings were fake.

      See Air Transat Flight 236 as an example. They had to glide an Airbus A330 for 121km after basically ignoring a fuel leak. The first computer warnings didn't make sense to them, so the pilots determined there was a major computer glitch but the aircraft itself was OK. After that, they ignored all the other problems that popped up on their displays until they run out of fuel.

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