http://qs321.pair.com?node_id=11147336


in reply to Re: Google scripts, google, and email
in thread Google scripts, google, and email

Ok, thx, hippo. That's a good start. What I'm finding as I knock the cobwebs off scripts is that I had left things unfinished, and the problem with my heavily-google-dependent scripts was that I hadn't loaded the data, so google didn't have a response.

Another variety of google coming up with weird things is like this:

fritz@laptop:~/Documents$ ./1.lys.pl Subroutine get_logger redefined at ./1.lys.pl line 47. INFO: ./1.lys.pl INFO: return from the google is -30 meters INFO: Lysychansk on 2022-10-11T03:22:31 (1665476551 seconds unix-epoch +) timezone: -0500 (lat: 38.4324101, lon: 48.9207881) at height -28 m +eters INFO: Object Azimuth Elevation INFO: Jupiter 19.4268573032889 -50.7078930524939 INFO: Moon 336.298782353501 -36.1827200711628 INFO: Saturn 79.8122077165904 -38.9955330829549 INFO: return from the google is 821 meters INFO: in the 'Ho on 2022-10-11T03:22:31 (1665433351 seconds unix-epoch +) timezone: +0700 (lat: 43.61, lon: -116.2) at height 823 meters INFO: Object Azimuth Elevation INFO: Jupiter 36.2621632578313 -41.0584802357843 INFO: Moon 1.03055134306704 -36.9777514240792 INFO: Saturn 86.7497259872478 -27.6215597186519 fritz@laptop:~/Documents$

bliako may differ with me, but I think it is within their reach to have a valid number for the altitude of this hill, but they don't publish it so as not to be used the people who are targeting civilians, as they did today with approximately 85 missiles.

Script here for interested parties:

#!/usr/bin/perl use v5.030; # strictness implied use warnings; use feature qw[ signatures ]; no warnings qw[ experimental::signatures ]; use Astro::Coord::ECI::Utils 'deg2rad'; use Astro::Coords; use Astro::MoonPhase; use Astro::Telescope; use Data::Dumper; use DateTime; use DateTime::Format::ISO8601; use DateTime::TimeZone; use Log::Log4perl; use Try::Tiny; our $debug = 0; my $time_str = "03:22:31"; my $alt = 0; my $date_str = "2022-10-11"; my @events = ( { "name" => "Lysychansk", "date" => $date_str, "time" => $time_str, "location" => { lon => 48.9207881, lat => 38.4324101}, }, { "name" => "in the 'Ho", "date" => $date_str, "time" => $time_str, "location" => { lon => -116.2, lat => 43.61 }, }, ); # Not wanting to divine the configuration file for Log::Log4perl, modu +le used in # the query. Better for SSCCE considerations. thx parv { package Log::Log4perl; sub get_logger ($pkg) { return bless [], $pkg; } sub show (@arg) { warn @arg, "\n"; } sub debug ( $ignore, @rest ) { show( 'DEBUG: ', @rest ); } sub info ( $ignore, @rest ) { show( 'INFO: ', @rest ); } sub warn ( $ignore, @rest ) { show( 'WARNING: ', @rest ); } sub error ( $ignore, @rest ) { die 'ERROR: ', @rest, "\n"; } } my $logger = Log::Log4perl->get_logger(); $logger->info("$0"); ## event loop for my $event (@events) { my $epoch = parse_event($event); ## determine altitude # usage: die unless exists $event->{location}; # restriction my $return = get_elevation_from_coordinates( $event->{location}->{la +t}, $event->{location}->{lon}, $debug ); $logger->info("return from the google is $return meters"); my $observer = $return + 2; #(most people stand) $logger->info( event2str($event) . " at height $observer meters" ); $logger->info("Object\tAzimuth\t\tElevation"); for my $name (qw/Jupiter Moon Saturn/) { my $planet = Astro::Coords->new( planet => $name ); # use DateTime my $date = DateTime->from_epoch( epoch => $epoch, time_zone => 'UT +C' ); $planet->datetime($date); $planet->telescope( Astro::Telescope->new( Name => $event->{name}, Long => deg2rad( $event->{location}->{lon} ), Lat => deg2rad( $event->{location}->{lat} ), Alt => $observer, #meters above +sea level ) ); my $az = $planet->az( format => 'deg' ); my $el = $planet->el( format => 'deg' ); $logger->info("$name\t$az\t\t$el"); } ## end planets loop } ## end event loop sub event2str { my $event = shift; if ( !exists $event->{_is_parsed} ) { warn "event has not been parsed, just dumping it..."; print Dump($event); } my $str = $event->{name} . " on " . $event->{datetime} . " (" . $event->{datetime}->epoch . " seconds unix-epoch)" . " timezone: " . $event->{datetime}->time_zone->name; if ( exists $event->{location} ) { if ( ref( $event->{location} ) eq 'HASH' ) { $str .= " (lat: " . $event->{location}->{lat} . ", lon: " . $event->{location}->{lon} . ")"; } else { $str .= "(" . $event->{location} . ")" } } return $str; } sub parse_event { my $event = shift; $debug //= 0; if ( !exists $event->{date} ) { die "date field is missing from even +t." } my $datestr = $event->{date}; die "event does not have a 'name' field, please specify one, anythin +g really." unless exists $event->{name}; my $timestr = "00:00:01"; if ( exists $event->{time} ) { $timestr = $event->{time}; print "event2epoch(): setting time to '$timestr' ...\n" if $debug > 0; die "time '$timestr' is not valid, it must be in the form 'hh:mm:s +s'." unless $timestr =~ /^\d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2}$/; } else { $event->{time} = $timestr } my $isostr = $datestr . 'T' . $timestr; my $dt = DateTime::Format::ISO8601->parse_datetime($isostr); die "failed to parse date '$isostr', check date and time fields." unless defined $dt; $event->{datetime} = $dt; my $tzstr = 'UTC'; if ( exists $event->{timezone} ) { $tzstr = $event->{timezone}; print "event2epoch(): found a timezone via 'timezone' field as '$tzstr' (tha +t does not mean it is valid) ...\n" if $debug > 0; } elsif ( exists $event->{location} ) { my $loc = $event->{location}; if ( ( ref($loc) eq '' ) && ( $loc =~ /^[a-zA-Z]$/ ) ) { # we have a location string my @alltzs = DateTime::TimeZone->all_names; my $tzstr; for (@alltzs) { if ( $_ =~ /$loc/i ) { $tzstr = $_; last } } die "event's location can not be converted to a timezone, consider specify +ing the 'timezone' directly or setting 'location' coordinates with: \ +[lat,lon\]." unless $tzstr; print "event2epoch(): setting timezone via 'location' name to '$timestr' ... +\n" if $debug > 0; } elsif ( ( ref($loc) eq 'HASH' ) && ( exists $loc->{lat} ) && ( exists $loc->{lon} ) ) { # we have a [lat,lon] array for location require Geo::Location::TimeZone; my $gltzobj = Geo::Location::TimeZone->new(); $tzstr = $gltzobj->lookup( lat => $loc->{lat}, lon => $loc->{lon +} ); if ( !$tzstr ) { die "timezone lookup from location coordinates lat:" . $loc->{lat} . ", lon:" . $loc->{lon} . " has failed."; } print "event2epoch(): setting timezone via 'location' coordinate +s lat:" . $loc->{lat} . ", lon:" . $loc->{lon} . " ...\n" if $debug > 0; } } if ($tzstr) { print "event2epoch(): deduced timezone to '$tzstr' and setting it +...\n" if $debug > 0; try { $dt->set_time_zone($tzstr) } catch { die "$_\n failed to set the timezone '$tzstr', is it valid?" } } $event->{_is_parsed} = 1; $event->{epoch} = $dt->epoch; return $event->{epoch}; } sub get_elevation_from_coordinates { my ( $lat, $lon, $debug ) = @_; use LWP::UserAgent; use HTTP::Request; use Data::Roundtrip; $debug //= 0; my $ua = LWP::UserAgent->new( agent => 'Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux x86_64; rv:78.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox +/78.0', ); my $response; my $payload = 'latitude=' . $lat . '&longitude=' . $lon . '&application_max_assets_mtime=1559625591'; my $payloadlen = length($payload); # this request was translated from Curl command-line # by [Corion]'s https://corion.net/curl2lwp.psgi my $req = HTTP::Request->new( 'POST' => 'https://www.mapcoordinates.net/admin/component/edit/Vpc_MapCoordinate +s_Advanced_GoogleMapCoords_Component/Component/json-get-elevation', [ 'Connection' => 'keep-alive', 'Accept' => '*/*', 'Accept-Encoding' => 'gzip, x-gzip, deflate, x-bzip2, bzip2', 'Accept-Language' => 'en-US,en;q=0.5', # 'Host' => 'www.mapcoordinates.net:443', 'Referer' => 'https://www.mapcoordinates.net/en', 'User-Agent' => 'Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux x86_64; rv:78.0) Gecko/20100101 Firef +ox/78.0', 'Content-Length' => $payloadlen, 'Content-Type' => 'application/x-www-form-urlencoded; charse +t=UTF-8', 'DNT' => '1', 'Origin' => 'https://www.mapcoordinates.net', 'X-Requested-With' => 'XMLHttpRequest' ], $payload ); die "call to HTTP::Request has failed" unless $req; if ( $debug > 0 ) { $logger->debug( "$0 : $payload\n$0 : sending above payload, of $payloadlen bytes +..."); } $response = $ua->request($req); die "Error fetching: " . $response->status_line unless $response->is_success; my $content = $response->decoded_content; my $data = Data::Roundtrip::json2perl($content); die "failed to parse received data:\n$content\n" unless exists $data->{'elevation'}; return $data->{'elevation'}; } __END__ fritz@laptop:~/Documents$

I'm still curious about the question of whether an email from Berlin to Moscow goes through. Does anyone know? (I'm fresh out of people in Moscow I talk to. Hi Ed, if you read this.)

Also, can someone enumerate instances of google misusing people's information or the potential to do so? I talk about needing to have some rapport/realpolitik with giant evil corporations, but this is a step too far for me.

Is there a treatment out there from sysadmins about why an organization should have one document on a secure site and send out links to that one secure document as opposed to sending it as a mass email attachment where 60% of the recipients have no context for it whatsoever?

Do well-intentioned people create a polluted digital spam ocean by sending mass email with attachments?

Replies are listed 'Best First'.
Re^3: Google scripts, google, and email
by hippo (Bishop) on Oct 11, 2022 at 08:36 UTC
    I'm still curious about the question of whether an email from Berlin to Moscow goes through. Does anyone know?

    Schrödinger famously said that a sent email is in a superposition of both received and unreceived states until the intended recipient actually looks in their inbox*.

    An email might get through. I can confidently assert that more than 0% and less than 100% of the emails sent from any city to any other city will arrive successfully at their intended destination in an uncorrupted form.

    * I'm paraphrasing, of course.


    🦛

      Schrödinger famously said that a sent email is in a superposition of both received and unreceived states until the intended recipient actually looks in their inbox*.

      Then I think that we would agree that frivolous use of email amounts to a useless use of Schrödinger's cat.

Re^3: Google scripts, google, and email [cost of email]
by hv (Prior) on Oct 11, 2022 at 02:57 UTC

    Do well-intentioned people create a polluted digital spam ocean by sending mass email with attachments?

    I spoke recently with a local deli owner who apologetically explained to me that she had recently been working to reduce her carbon footprint, and as part of that process was avoiding replying to emails except where strictly necessary. That prompted me to look into the carbon cost of email, on which subject there is quite a lot of information.

    A lot of that is based on the first (2010) edition of How Bad are Bananas by Mike Berners-Lee (brother of Sir Tim), but the figures were substantially revised with more up-to-date information in the 2020 edition. See for example the carbon cost of an email.

    This may be an angle - either as "carbon cost" (for the planet) or as "energy cost" (for the bills) - by which to argue your point.

Re^3: Google scripts, google, and email
by pryrt (Abbot) on Oct 11, 2022 at 13:42 UTC
    I'm still curious about the question of whether an email from Berlin to Moscow goes through. Does anyone know?

    An email from a major provider (gmail, etc) is much more likely (in many circumstances) to make it past spam blocks and other blocks than emails from "lesser" servers. An email from your ISP's mail host may be more or less or equally likely to make it through than one from a self-hosted mailserver, depending on how well those servers are set up (getting SPF, DKIM, DMARC, and the other such settings right can be difficult).

    But when you are talking about emails crossing political borders that involve international tensions, there are likely a lot of other factors completely out of your control. Asking us to tell you whether it will get through or not is not necessarily helpful to you, as our experience in such matters may vary from yours. (Personally, I have not knowingly tried to email someone in Moscow, so I cannot give an anecdote, helpful or otherwise.)