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Re: Adding only searched values to array ref

by AnomalousMonk (Bishop)
on Sep 20, 2021 at 18:02 UTC ( #11136884=note: print w/replies, xml ) Need Help??


in reply to Adding only searched values to array ref

Here's a solution to the first part of what I guess your problem may be. (Please see Short, Self-Contained, Correct Example and How do I post a question effectively? and I know what I mean. Why don't you?)

Win8 Strawberry 5.8.9.5 (32) Mon 09/20/2021 13:56:49 C:\@Work\Perl\monks >perl -Mstrict -Mwarnings use Data::Dumper; my $accounts = [ { 'date' => '1980-03-05', 'year' => '2019', 'acc' => '44443', }, { 'date' => '1999-06-19', 'year' => '2017', 'acc' => '54321', }, { 'date' => '1999-09-19', 'year' => '2099', 'acc' => '12345', }, ]; my $filtered_accounts = [ grep { $_->{'acc'} ne '54321' } @$accounts ] +; print Dumper $filtered_accounts; ^Z $VAR1 = [ { 'date' => '1980-03-05', 'acc' => '44443', 'year' => '2019' }, { 'date' => '1999-09-19', 'acc' => '12345', 'year' => '2099' } ];

Update: I don't really understand the rest of the OPed problem.


Give a man a fish:  <%-{-{-{-<

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Re^2: Adding only searched values to array ref
by Anonymous Monk on Sep 20, 2021 at 18:52 UTC
    Once the search is done, it would be adding the two arrays together, $filtered_accounts to $all.

      There are a few ways to add (actually append in this case) one array to another, even if they are array references. A couple:

      Win8 Strawberry 5.8.9.5 (32) Mon 09/20/2021 15:47:19 C:\@Work\Perl\monks >perl -Mstrict -Mwarnings use Data::Dumper; my $ar_1 = [ qw(knights who say ni) ]; my $ar_2 = [ qw(foo bar baz quux) ]; # push @$ar_1, @$ar_2; $ar_1 = [ @$ar_1, @$ar_2 ]; print Dumper $ar_1; ^Z $VAR1 = [ 'knights', 'who', 'say', 'ni', 'foo', 'bar', 'baz', 'quux' ];
      Both methods produce the same results. I prefer the method using push: it's more familiar and readable IMHO, possibly a bit faster. In both cases, a shallow copy of the appended array is done.


      Give a man a fish:  <%-{-{-{-<

      Ok, now that we understand the real end objective, consider just writing a simple for loop as shown below.

      Update: As ++AnomalousMonk points out, my "solution" had the wrong sense on the compare! It should be ne instead of == just as he suggested.

      I put the my original code into readmore brackets. The new code with one line of code + comments changed is below.

      Note this brings up the issue of whether or not a duplication can occur of a record already in the $all array? see below.

      use strict; use warnings; use Data::Dump qw (pp); my $accounts = [ { 'date' => '1980-03-05', 'year' => '2019', 'acc' => '44443', }, { 'date' => '1999-06-19', 'year' => '2017', 'acc' => '54321', }, { 'date' => '1999-09-19', 'year' => '2099', 'acc' => '12345', }, ]; my $all = [ { 'date' => '2000-01-00', 'year' => '2003', 'acc' => '4327', }, { 'date' => '1987-01-03', 'year' => '2013', 'acc' => '89997', }, { 'date' => '1980-04-18', 'year' => '2016', 'acc' => '239876A', }, { 'date' => '1999-06-19', 'year' => '2017', 'acc' => '54321', } ]; # add all hashes from $accounts to $all, but # exclude account 44443, if it is there foreach my $href (@$accounts) { push @$all, $href if $href->{acc} ne '44443'; #note string compar +e } pp $all; __END__ [ { acc => 4327, date => "2000-01-00", year => 2003 }, { acc => 89997, date => "1987-01-03", year => 2013 }, { acc => "239876A", date => "1980-04-18", year => 2016 }, { acc => 54321, date => "1999-06-19", year => 2017 }, { acc => 54321, date => "1999-06-19", year => 2017 }, { acc => 12345, date => "1999-09-19", year => 2099 }, ] Note: account OP's test $account data did contain a record that alread +y exists in the $all array. This results in a duplicate record. See acc=> 54321 above. There are of course ways to prevent that duplication. Before suggesting code for that, I'd like to hear from the OP whether this can really happen in "the real world" and if such a solution is even needed.
      Update2:
      Well, ok. I will show how to get rid of the dupes.
      Because this code illustrates another aspect of Perl.

      It is perfectly ok for the input and the output of a grep to be the same array. Perl will keep it straight so that it doesn't "write over its own input".

      # make the @$all array the union of everything in # either @$all or @$accounts, excluding the acc 44443 record # (if it exists at all) and exclude any possible duplicates # This "zaps" the duplicate 54321 record. # This literally says, "transfer the input to the output if # the input record isn't about account 44443 and we haven't # already transferred that record to the output before. # This assumes that records are uniquely id'ed by the acc # number. That might or might not be true in the actual # application. my %seen; @$all = grep{ $_->{acc} ne '44443' and !$seen{$_->{acc}}++ } @$all,@$a +ccounts;
      Of course this can also be formulated using an explicit for loop.
      All greps "hide" a for loop. It is there even if it doesn't quite look that way.

        ++Marshall for the post, but

        • since an 'acc' value like '239876A' seems possible (per the OPed example), a string comparison should be used; and
        • the OPed example wants records added to the output array if a particular key does not have a certain value, so ne should be used, e.g.,
              push @$all, $href if $href->{acc} ne '44443';
          (untested).


        Give a man a fish:  <%-{-{-{-<

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